Weekly Roundup June 16, 2006

By Exclusive Concepts Blog Team

Microsoft

Biggest news of the week. The world’s most famous blogger, Robert Scoble is leaving Microsoft a for a start-up., PodTech.net.

Read Scobel’s exit interview by Mary Jo Foley

Second biggest news of the week. Bill Gates will step down from his day to day job in two years.

Microsoft developing a rival to Apple’s iPod and iTunes.

Bots are contaminating vast swaths of the Internet. 60% infection rate found by Microsoft who announced it found and removed bots from 6 out of 10 Windows computers. The company checked 5.7 million computers during a 15 month period.

Why Wall Street didn’t believe Steve Ballmer (and what he can do about it).

Yahoo

Wired says Yahoo “strictest” censor in China

Yahoo, world’s most popular email, hit by worm they call Yammer. Delete anything called “New Graphic Site.”

Yahoo Answers is becoming a social interacting phenomenon, says Search Engine Watch with more than 10 million answers posted and becoming the third largest reference site on the Web.

Social networking, blogs and RSS

Moms as a group, 32 million of them, spend as much time online as all other women. They are the hot demographic at social networking sites, attracting 70% of mothers online, says eMarketer.. Mommybuzz is one, Clubmom is another.

“Sick blogs” help afflicted share news and seek comfort

AOL to turn Netscape site into a newspaper of sorts with news articles submitted by users and expanded on by bloggers.

Google

NYC Google Maps Mashup Roundup

Google launchs a federal government search site. Washington Post says it may have the edge over the MSN Firstgov.gov search site.

Google is Killing the Economics of Content by driving the creation of sites that exist solely to squeeze money from Adsense.

Hiding in Plain Sight, Google Seeks More Power

Google Fatigue Sets In

The Economist looks for The Un-Google in the lucrative market for web search

Around the Web

Ebay integrates Skype into auctions.

Verizon offers to be your kid’s chaperones.

While teen-agers are using ring tones too high for adults to hear so they can keep texting in class.

And others still don’t realize that their online persona undermines their resumes.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInShare